Antitrust authorities are increasingly interested in pricing algorithms

A few months ago, we considered whether pricing algorithms might be the European Commission’s next antitrust target (here). The Commission had warned companies about the risks of using algorithms to collude, and indicated that pricing software formed part of its investigation into consumer electronics.

Since then, the Commission has published its Final Report on the E-commerce Sector Inquiry (“Final Report”, see our commentary here). This specifically identifies the wide-scale use of pricing software as something that may raise competition concerns, noting that the “availability of pricing information may trigger automatised price coordination” (13).  The Final Report also claims that comments from retailers point to manufacturers making use of retail price maintenance.  It suggests that pricing software may make it easier for manufacturers to retaliate against retailers that deviate from desired pricing, which may even limit the incentive for retailers to deviate from pricing recommendations in the first place.  The Final Report also considers that pricing algorithms could facilitate or strengthen collusion between retailers – the algorithms make it easier for retailers to detect any deviations from prices implemented under a collusive agreement (33).

At the start of this month the Commission announced an investigation into whether the clothing manufacturer and retailer Guess illegally restricts retailers from selling cross-border within the EU.  It seems likely that this investigation arose out of information the Commission received through the E-commerce Sector Inquiry. Bearing in mind the Commission’s comments on pricing algorithms in the Final Report, there is real potential for subsequent investigations into their use.   

OECD Roundtable

Further insights into the Commission’s current thinking can be drawn from the OECD Roundtable currently taking place on ‘Algorithms and collusion’ (see here).  The Commission's contribution paper identifies the potential harmful effects that pricing algorithms may have in both vertical and horizontal contexts, namely by facilitating collusion and making collusion easier to enforce.  It expands upon the concerns identified in the Final Report, offering by way of example a scenario where retailer A is adhering to retail price maintenance, and retailer B is monitoring and matching retailer A’s prices using pricing software (16).  This is said to show how artificially high prices caused by retail price maintenance can easily spread to other ‘innocent’ retailers through the use of pricing software.  

The paper notes that where firms are using algorithms to engage in explicit collusion, it is clear that the firms are still liable for their behaviour.  It suggests that to a large extent, pricing algorithms can be analysed under traditional EU competition law.  However, it also spends some time discussing the issue of tacit collusion, where there is no anti-competitive agreement involved and therefore the conduct of non-dominant companies acting independently falls outside the EU competition law framework.  Does algorithmic pricing make tacit collusion more pervasive and more effective?  If so, how should competition authorities respond? 

As the paper recognises, this is an area of on-going debate.  Nevertheless, it considers potential options such as whether the market itself may correct ‘algorithm-enabled tacit collusion’ through the development of ‘consumer algorithms’ that could track prices and even identify ‘maverick’ sellers not engaging in algorithmic pricing that consumers could purchase from.  It also explores whether changes to the law on tacit collusion might be effective, or whether the interpretation of ‘communication’ should be expanded in order to bring algorithm-enabled price matching within the scope of Article 101 TFEU.

The UK CMA's contribution to the Roundtable has less of a focus on pricing algorithms. It identifies a few potential theories of harm that may apply to the use of algorithms more broadly:

  • Facilitating the implementation or maintenance of a collusive agreement.
  • Facilitating behavioural discrimination (e.g. price discrimination where consumers are set individual prices based on algorithmic assessment of the highest price that consumer is likely to pay).
  • Reinforcing dominance or raising barriers to entry (relating to the typical requirement for large volumes of data to make an algorithm effective).
The CMA recognises that algorithms can give rise to many consumer benefits. However, it also notes that they could lead to competitive or consumer harm in novel, untested ways, and that it is challenging to detect and understand the exact effect of complex algorithms, particularly given that they rapidly evolve (whether through constant refinement from developers or via ‘self-learning’).

Despite this, the CMA appears to be more comfortable than the Commission in its ability to combat this sort of issue. It notes that “the flexible, principles-based UK competition law framework has to date shown itself able to accommodate technological change, and to be capable of flexible and effective use to tackle a wide range of novel competition harms” (43). It plans to invest in in-house technological expertise and new digital forensic tools in response to the challenges posed by the use of algorithms.

Conclusion

These two OECD contribution papers were prepared for a Roundtable discussion – they do not reflect the Commission’s or the CMA’s official stance on pricing algorithms.  However, they provide an interesting insight: these authorities are clearly paying a good deal of attention to the potential competition issues raised by algorithms.  Coupled with the increasing enforcement activity by the Commission in the e-commerce sector, pricing algorithms continue to be one of the trending topics in competition law in Europe. 

Unwired Planet v Huawei: a new FRAND injunction

Mr Justice Birss has once again broken new legal ground by granting what he has termed a ‘FRAND injunction in Unwired Planet v Huawei.

As a reminder, in April Mr Justice Birss handed down the first UK court decision determining a FRAND royalty rate (see here). A post-judgment hearing took place in May to establish whether or not Huawei should be subject to an injunction in the UK and the issue of permission to appeal.

The FRAND injunction

At the post-judgment hearing, Huawei had argued that the judge should not grant an injunction. As Huawei intended to appeal the decision, it said that it could not enter into the FRAND licence agreement at this stage, in case the Court of Appeal determined that different FRAND terms were appropriate. Huawei claimed that to grant an injunction now would effectively be punishing it for exercising its right to appeal. It also noted that if an injunction was granted, it would last until 2028 (when the patent found valid and infringed in the first patent trial expired), despite the FRAND licence agreement expiring in 2020. Therefore, Huawei would be forced to negotiate a new licence from an extremely weak position – it would automatically be injuncted if terms could not be agreed. 

Huawei requested that the judge accept undertakings in lieu of granting an injunction, offering to: (a) enter into the licence following its appeal, and (b) to comply with the terms of the licence as if it was in effect (including paying royalties) until its appeal was finished.

Mr Justice Birss essentially took the view that the offer of undertakings now was too little, too late. He decided that an injunction should be granted. However, he recognised the risk that this might affect negotiations or disputes about the terms of the licence in later years. To resolve this, he granted a new kind of injunction, which he called a “FRAND injunction”. This would be like a normal injunction, but with the following extra features:

  • A proviso that it would cease to have effect when the defendant enters into a FRAND licence; and
  • Express liberty to return to court to decide whether the injunction should take effect again at the end of the FRAND licence (if it ends before the relevant patents expire, or ceases to have effect for any other reason).
The injunction is to be stayed pending the result of the appeal, on terms that provide for appropriate royalty payments from Huawei to Unwired Planet in the meantime.

Permission to appeal 

Mr Justice Birss granted Huawei permission to appeal on three main issues:

  1. The global licence: including: (i) whether more than one set of terms can be FRAND, (ii) whether a UK only licence was FRAND, (iii) whether the court is able to determine FRAND terms, including rates, for territories other than the UK, and (iv) whether it is appropriate to grant an injunction excluding Huawei from the UK market unless it took a global licence.
  2. Hard-edged non-discrimination: Huawei have permission to appeal the finding that a distortion of competition is required for the non-discrimination aspect of FRAND to apply, but not whether or not there was a distortion of competition in this case.
  3. Huawei v ZTE (Article 102 TFEU): regarding the judge’s findings on abuse of dominance and injunctive relief.
This permits a fairly wide-ranging appeal, especially as regards the competition law elements of the latter two issues. The trial judgment appeared to downplay the importance of competition law in FRAND issues (see here for more information); the appeal may enable a renewed focus on it.

The FRAND licence 

In his main trial judgment, Mr Justice Birss settled the terms of the FRAND licence to be entered into by Unwired Planet and Huawei. This latest judgment annexes a copy of the final form of that licence. Given the shroud of secrecy that usually surrounds such patent licence agreements, this is a unique insight, reflective of the judge’s desire throughout the case to ensure as much transparency as possible.

Transparency is likely to be helpful as the law in this area continues to develop. With the advent of new technologies developed for 5G and the Internet of Things, new companies may need to enter the FRAND licensing field for the first time. Without being able to draw upon any previous experience of negotiating licences in this area, they will be at a disadvantage in negotiations. 

If other judgments follow Mr Justice Birss’ lead and annex copies of any FRAND agreement determined by the court, these would provide useful points of reference for negotiating parties. It might also reduce the requirements for third party disclosure (a costly, time-consuming exercise) in any subsequent litigation. Otherwise, such disclosure will be essential in FRAND cases involving relatively new entrants to the market – they are unlikely to have many licence agreements that can be used by the judge as comparables as part of the process for determining a FRAND rate.

Conclusion

Yet again, Mr Justice Birss provides plenty of food for thought. Assuming that Huawei does go ahead with its appeal, it will be fascinating to see how the Court of Appeal responds to these issues.

Pat Treacy and Matt Hunt